52% of hotels in Thailand could close temporarily while 9% may close permanently

With Thailand’s tourism industry still barely functioning, 52% of hotels in Thailand could close temporarily in the next few weeks, while the operators of 9% of Thai hotels say they may close permanently.

That is on top of the many Thai hotels that have already closed due to the country being locked to most international tourists for over 18 months, as well as stricter and stricter travel restrictions and lockdowns perpetrated against potential domestic tourists.


The news about Thailand’s devastated hotel industry comes after a joint survey by the Bank of Thailand and Thai Hotels Association (THA) also discovered 62% of the hotel operators surveyed were planning on reducing labor costs — ie: laying off staff, or drastically reducing their hours.

As for hotels on Phuket, as was predicted months ago by foreigners living in Thailand and active on social media, 38% of those hotel operators in the Phuket Sandbox said the number of foreign tourists taking advantage of the Sandbox was fewer than they expected.

No surprise at these comments either as, in many Phuket hotels taking part in the Sandbox, the average occupancy rate is a pitiful 15%.

 

Hotel operators in the Samui Plus program say the number of foreign tourists is very low

Hotel operators taking part in the Samui Plus program are even worse off, reporting an abysmal average occupancy rate of just 4%.

An occupancy rate no hotel can cope with and remain open for long.

Then again, with only 621 foreign tourists taking advantage of the Samui Plus program so far, and lower numbers arriving in recent days, most Samui hotels will continue to struggle. (continue reading after the promo…)

Average monthly income on Phuket in 2021 is 1,961 baht — that’s a shocking $60

Meanwhile, the Thai government and the Center for Covid-19 Situation Administration (CCSA) continues to insist on several Covid tests during every tourists’ stay on Phuket or Samui, expensive Covid-19 insurance, mandatory masks everywhere even on the beach, a ban on alcohol in area restaurants, bars and entertainment venues to remain closed and on and on — and still, strangely, believe international tourists will want to vacation in Thailand.

Then again, with so many hotels in Thailand planning to close in the next few weeks if more tourists do not arrive, where would any increased numbers stay anyway?